IDBURY PRINTS

PHILIPPE AUGUSTE CATTELAIN (French / 1838-1893)

Philippe Auguste Cattelain was born in Paris. He was a close friend of the satirical artist André Gill, who nicknamed him Agricol, because of his resemblance to a character in a novel by Eugène Sue. Gill characterized him as "moitié ouvrier, moitié artiste" (half worker, half artist). Cattelain was noted for his physical strength and courage. Gill remembered seeing him, working as a removal man, hoist a piano onto his shoulders, carry it up five flights of stairs, set it down, open the lid, and calmly start to play, to the astonishment of the piano's owner. Philippe Cattelain published his first drawings in the satirical journal Le Hanneton in 1868, but his artistic career was interrupted by a three-year jail sentence for his part in the Paris Commune of 1871, which he recalled in his Mémoires du Chef de la Sûreté de la Commune in 1884. Freed from prison in 1874, Cattelain was exiled in England until an amnesty was granted to former Communards in 1880. Cattelain's health was broken by a combination of smallpox, his experiences in the Commune and in prison, and his fondness for absinthe. Philippe Cattelain died in Paris at the age of 55. Original etchings by Cattelain very rarely come on the market.

See also:

GUSTAVE COURBET

Selected prints by PHILIPPE AUGUSTE CATTELAIN

Arrivant d'Alsace, 1876
Etching •SOLD
Une cellule de
prison, 1876
Etching •SOLD

View all available prints by PHILIPPE AUGUSTE CATTELAIN