IDBURY PRINTS

LUCIEN LEVY-DHURMER (French / 1865-1944)

Lucien Lévy-Dhurmer was a painter, printmaker, sculptor. Lévy-Dhurmer was born in Algiers, into a Jewish family. His real name was Lucien Lévy, to which he added a corruption of his mother's maiden name, Goldhurmer, to differentiate himself from other artists named Lévy. Although he did not attend the Beaux-Arts, Paris, as a regular student, Lévy-Dhurmer benefitted from advice and encouragement from several teachers there, including Raphaël Collin, Vio, and Wallet. He first exhibited at the Salon des Artistes Français in 1882. From 1887-1895 Lévy-Dhurmer worked as artistic director of the ceramics factory of Clément Massier, becoming known for his experiments with metallic lustre glazes and for his Islamic-influenced Hispano-Moresque designs. It was not until 1895 that Lévy-Dhurmer returned to Paris, to take up painting full time. His paintings and pastels of melancholy women, in a dreamy Symbolist style, exhibited at the Galerie Georges Petit in 1896, were a success both with the public and his fellow artists. Lévy-Dhurmer was a close friend of the Belgian Symbolist writer Georges Rodenbach; he illustrated Rodenbach's decadent novel Bruges-la-Morte, and his portrait of Rodenbach in the Musée d'Orsay is one of his most successful works. From 1906, Lévy-Dhurmer exhibited at the Salon de la Société Nationale des Beaux-Arts. In his later years, Lévy-Dhurmer abandoned overt Symbolism, but he remained committed to the Symbolist aesthetic of using art to open a window into another world; he was particularly interested in finding a visual correlative for music. Around 1910 Lévy-Dhurmer became interested in interior design, and the Art Nouveau concept of the interior as an integrated and coherent work of art. The magnificent Wisteria Drawing Room that he created in 1910-1914 for his friend Auguste Rateau is now on display in the New Galleries for 19th and early 29th Century European Paintings and Sculpture at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. In 1973 a major exhibition at the Grand Palais, Autour de Lévy-Dhurmer, placed his art in the context of the period, and the work of other Symbolist and Intimiste artists, such as Ernest Laurent, Charles Cottet, Henri Le Sidaner, and Edmond Aman-Jean.

See also:

EDMOND FRANÇOIS AMAN-JEAN
CAMILLE FELIX BELLANGER
CHARLES COTTET
HENRI HÉRAN
ERNEST JOSEPH LAURENT
HENRI EUGÈNE AUGUSTIN LE SIDANER

Selected prints by LUCIEN LEVY-DHURMER

Canal in Bruges, 1930
Etching
Trees in Bruges, 1930
Etching
Georges Rodenbach, 1930
Etching •SOLD

View all available prints by LUCIEN LEVY-DHURMER