IDBURY PRINTS

THEOPHILE-ALEXANDRE STEINLEN (Swiss/French / 1859-1923)

One of the great artists of the Belle Époque, Théophile-Alexandre Steinlen was a master of every printmaking technique, including lithography, etching, aquatint, and drypoint. Steinlen was born in Lausanne, and started life as an apprentice designer in a textile factory. He moved to Montmartre in his 20s, determined to be an artist. He was befriended by Adolphe Willette, who introduced him to the chansonnier Aristide Bruant, who commissioned lithographic posters for his cabaret Le Chat Noir. In this as in much else, Théophile-Alexandre Steinlen followed in the footsteps of Toulouse-Lautrec; it is said that Yvette Guilbert preferred Steinlen's posters of her to Lautrec's. Steinlen exhibited paintings at the Salon des Indépendants, but it is as a printmaker that he is most celebrated. Two of his major works as a lithographer were for collections of songs by the chansonnier Paul Delmet, Chansons de Femmes and Chansons de Montemartre. Besides these, and his posters, Théophile-Alexandre Steinlen was also a prominent contributor to satirical journals such as Le Rire and L'Assiette au Beurre. See: Ernest de Crauzat, L’oeuvre gravé et lithographié de Steinlen, catalogue descriptif et analytique.

See also:

VAN HOUTEN
GEORGES VILLA
ADOLPHE WILLETTE

Selected prints by THEOPHILE-ALEXANDRE STEINLEN

La grande soeur, 1913
Drypoint
Bal de Barrière, 1898
Lithograph

View all available prints by THEOPHILE-ALEXANDRE STEINLEN