IDBURY PRINTS

ALMERY LOBEL-RICHE (French / 1877-1950)

Born to French parents in Geneva, Switzerland, Alméry Lobel-Riche (real name, Alméric Riche) was a towering figure in French print-making. He never formed part of any school, although there is a clear influence in his work of Symbolists such as Félicien Rops and Impressionists such as Louis Legrand, as well as the classical example of Ingres. The art of Alméry Lobel-Riche is characterized by a troubled and troubling atmosphere of decadent sensuality, and is very much the artistic counterpart of the poetry of Baudelaire and de Musset. Lobel-Riche studied at the École des Beaux-Arts de Montpelier, and then under Léon Bonnat at the Beaux-Arts, Paris. His first success came when his drawings were accepted for publication by Le Rire in 1895. Although he did execute some pastels (mainly of fashionable women), and oils during WWII when he was unable to access his printmaking atelier in Paris, the bulk of his work consists of etchings and drypoints. Lobel-Riche is particularly known for his female nudes, elegant women, ballet dancers, depictions of bars and dance halls, and North African scenes. Before WWI, Lobel-Riche established his reputation as a chronicler of the demi-monde of bars, dancehalls, and kept women. This pre-war work, such as the 40 etchings for Poupées de Paris, Bibelots de Luxe, is rich with the languorous sensuality of the Belle Époque. Lobel-Riche achieved such success with them that in 1913 he was able to afford a Bayard-Clément automobile. See: Boissy, Lobel-Riche, 1930; Margerit, Lobel-Riche, 1946; catalogue of the exhibition De Bonnard à Baselitz, Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris, 1992.

See also:

HENRI JOSEPH THOMAS
EDOUARD CHIMOT
PAUL CESAR HELLEU
LOUIS LEGRAND
FELICIEN ROPS
HENRI JOSEPH THOMAS

Selected prints by ALMERY LOBEL-RICHE

Dancer putting on
her shoes, 1949
Drypoint
Le Port, 1921
Etching

View all available prints by ALMERY LOBEL-RICHE