IDBURY PRINTS

GEORGE GROSZ (German/American / 1893-1959)

George Grosz was born Georg Ehrenfried Gross in Berlin in 1893. He studied at the Dresden Academy of Fine Arts and also under Emil Orlik in Berlin. George Grosz is best remembered for his vicious satirical drawings on 1920s Berlin, published in collections such as Ecce Homo, depicting a world of corruption and decadence peopled by unscrupulous leering businessmen and prostitutes. Grosz spent some time in Paris in 1924-1925, during which he illustrated with original lithographs Port d'eaux-mortes by his friend Pierre Mac Orlan [See, The Artist and the Book 1860-1960, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston & Harvard College Library, 1961, no. 129, p.91]. These lithographs are less savage than the Berlin drawings, although they still depict a world of sailors, prostitutes, and pimps, where a murdered prostitute in her crib passes unnoticed by those playing cards in the front room. In 1933 Grosz and his family fled the Nazis and settled in the USA; Grosz became a naturalized US citizen in 1938. George Grosz returned to Berlin in the 1950s and died there in 1959 after falling down a flight of stairs.

See also:

Selected prints by GEORGE GROSZ

Thomas Rowlandson
zum Andenken, 1921
Lithograph
Port d'eaux-mortes:
Au Beau Patron, 1926
Lithograph
Port d'eaux-mortes:
Prix 300, 1926
Lithograph

View all available prints by GEORGE GROSZ